Monthly Archives: November 2013

On Black Friday, Trying to Understand How to Prevent Other Days from Becoming Black

November 30th, 2013|

We live in difficult times, and I don’t mean obstacles to consumption over the next month. The only way to understand them is to try, and to enlist others to try along with us. So try these out: […]

Voters saw through Amendment 66

November 25th, 2013|

The crushing defeat of Amendment 66 was a seismic event in Colorado politics that will also reverberate nationally. By virtue of its size, audacity, and above all its setting, Amendment 66 was a potential template for those committed to growing government and redistributing wealth. As noted by 66 opponent Kelly Maher of Coloradans for Real Education Reform Colorado, Amendment 66 could answer a question long-posed by liberal political strategists across the country: “How do you sell a massive tax increase?” […]

Does God or government deserve your Thanksgiving?

November 21st, 2013|

Do you thank God or government for the circumstances of your life? It’s a relevant question as Americans approach Thanksgiving. The answer was clear to the extraordinary leaders who laid the groundwork for the colonies, fought for the founding of our country, and struggled to preserve our republic in the face of nationwide strife. […]

A little "momentum" is a dangerous thing

November 13th, 2013|

For once my constant state of overwork was useful, in that my analysis of last week’s election defeat of Amendment 66 now appears after the euphoria has worn off. […]

The practical impact of Veterans Day on veterans

November 13th, 2013|

Honoring current and former service members should be a nonpartisan proposition. I will do my best here to keep it so. But neglect of veterans’ issues, whether explicit or semantic, bespeaks a politics of exclusion that no party—and no community—should accept. […]

November elections: reading the tea leaves

November 10th, 2013|

(Denver) I once lived in London for five years and one of the many things I admired about the British was the extraordinary speed and efficiency with which they conducted national elections: Six weeks of intense campaigning to fill all 630 seats in Parliament and then it was over for another five years.

By contrast in the United States the day after a new President is inaugurated every news program in the country is breathlessly reporting which future Oval Office aspirant was seen at a chicken bake in Iowa or snowshoeing through New Hampshire. […]

Notions to the contrary, school board elections remain political events

November 6th, 2013|

The vagaries of deadlines and publishing dates are such that columnists in newspapers such as this one are often at a disadvantage. As I write this, I have no way of knowing how various school board elections turned out. Be that as it may, it’s a topic that cries out for comment. […]