About Alexander McMath

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So far Alexander McMath has created 9 blog entries.

Can we trust the government with the death penalty?

By |May 26th, 2015|

I shall ask for the abolition of the punishment of death until I have the infallibility of human judgment demonstrated to me. -Gilbert du Motier, Marquis du Lafayette (yes, that one)
I find that I am essentially for the death penalty in theory, but against it in practice. That’s one of those statements that is in danger of meaning nothing, like “supporting the troops but not the war.” In this case, however, I understand my position well enough to use such a platitude with my eyes wide open. […]

Conservatives and the death penalty

By |April 26th, 2015|

I’m not afraid to get embarrassed, and I want to share this philosophical, political, and epistemological journey with you, the reader, in hopes that you will enrich it.

I have not given comprehensive review to my […]

Responsibility, his and hers

By |February 3rd, 2014|

Listen to your hearts. YOUR hearts. Don’t make the puzzle any harder to put together than it has to be. […]

The real tragedy of the commons

By |December 3rd, 2013|

Hint: It’s still the liberal progressive communitarian apocalypse. […]

On Black Friday, Trying to Understand How to Prevent Other Days from Becoming Black

By |November 30th, 2013|

We live in difficult times, and I don’t mean obstacles to consumption over the next month. The only way to understand them is to try, and to enlist others to try along with us. So try these out: […]

A little "momentum" is a dangerous thing

By |November 13th, 2013|

For once my constant state of overwork was useful, in that my analysis of last week’s election defeat of Amendment 66 now appears after the euphoria has worn off. […]

The practical impact of Veterans Day on veterans

By |November 13th, 2013|

Honoring current and former service members should be a nonpartisan proposition. I will do my best here to keep it so. But neglect of veterans’ issues, whether explicit or semantic, bespeaks a politics of exclusion that no party—and no community—should accept. […]

"Open data," influence, and ethics in government

By |October 30th, 2013|

This past Friday, I headed up to Parker to attend CityCamp Colorado 2013: Change The Game. CityCamp is the annual conference of, an organization dedicated to “support[ing] a transformation that will lead to a simple, beautiful, and easy-to-use government”. Now, I’m aware that the word limited did not appear in that vision statement. But I believe the pursuit of transparent and accessible government data is one that encourages citizen engagement, and thus at least has the potential to diffuse the policy analysis and implementation process from concentration in the hands of a professional bureaucracy. With properly informed citizens, that is a good thing. However, ethical qualifications to the collection and usage of large government data sets are valid concerns. I was at times a bit worried that I was the only one so concerned. […]

Five Lessons from Conservative Persuasion Bootcamp

By |October 17th, 2013|

It happened right under our noses, even though we all knew better: a cabal of determined con men and women got everyone to believe that they were championing open and enlightened discourse, while they were actually just frightening everyone into silence ahead of the reality that the oligarchic governmentality to which they entitled themselves was in fact completely incoherent. […]