Establishment or Tea Party?

(’76 Contributor)  George W. Bush strategist Karl Rove looked like the proverbial cat that ate the canary. Republicans had won control of the U.S. Senate and the newcomers were all his kind of politicians. Commenting for Fox TV election night he recounted successes in Colorado, North Carolina, Kansas, Mississippi and Tennessee primaries using his super-PAC American Crossroads’ millions to defeat Tea Party candidates who challenged his Republican establishment favorites. Continue reading

Elections 2014: A Longer Perspective

(Denver) It is often the case with elections that those races that are most visible are actually less enduring in their significance and provide less insight into the deeper forces shaping our politics than do those less noticed but far more numerous contests further down the ballot. Continue reading

My first time voting

(Centennial Fellow) When I lived in China, we never had voting rights and all government officials were appointed, not voted for. Therefore, as ordinary citizens, we could never hold our leaders accountable because they never worried about being responsible to the people. All their concerns were how to please someone higher up. An official only lost his job if he displeased his boss. We the people in China are not considered as being governed, but rather being ruled. Government officials are in fact rulers. They act like rulers and they have the privilege of rulers. Continue reading

Signs of Healing in Ferguson

We’ve had plenty of rhetorical villains since the fatal police shooting of a black teen in Ferguson, Missouri, little more than grandstanders stirring up fear in vengeful tones. And we’ve had violence and looting, mostly by nonresidents taking advantage of a tragedy to enrich themselves. But we’ve had heroes, too, and, at the young man’s funeral, we had calls for engaged citizenship and a stop to community disruption.

Healing may be on the way. Continue reading

If Christians Don’t Vote, More Christians Will Be Persecuted

Mike Huckabee said on his show recently that only about 40 million of the 80 million evangelical Christians in America are even registered to vote. Only about half of those actually vote in presidential elections and only half of them, about 10 million, vote in midterms like the important election coming up Nov. 4. His numbers seem pretty accurate according to various sources, yet nearly 80% of Americans say they’re Christians. Continue reading