Is torture ever justified?

As a rule, torture is wrong because it violates the dignity of human beings created in the image of God. That is the same reason it is wrong to kill someone. It is wrong to kill or torture indiscriminately. It is wrong to take a sick pleasure in torturing prisoners of war like the North Vietnamese did to Navy pilot John McCain and many other American POWs. Continue reading

Obama’s Cuban mistake

The Cuba deal is a bad deal for the Cuban people and for America. The economic argument that more dollars to Cuba will improve freedom misses the point that we caved to the evil murderous Castros right at the point of their greatest weakness. They lost the patronage of Russia years ago, they are losing their Venezuelan support due to the drop in oil prices, Russia is further weakened as an ally for them for the same reason and the Castros are old. Continue reading

Religious liberty defended at debut of CCU’s Wilberforce Society

(’76 Cpntributor) On March 21, 1804, Sister Marie Theresa, Superior of the Sisters of the Order of Saint Ursula in New Orleans, sat down to write a letter. The Sisters of Saint Ursula were an ocean away from the violence of
post-Revolution France, but they were aware of the plight Continue reading

Lessons from Ferguson likely to go unheeded

Given the hyper-charged rhetoric and sheer level of irrationality surrounding the violence in Ferguson, Mo., I suppose we ought to consider ourselves fortunate if the principle lesson drawn from the whole sad affair is there are some people who like to break and throw things and set cars and stores on fire. Because it seems highly unlikely anything that would actually help poor black communities will be allowed to emerge from the ashes of that unfortunate city. Continue reading

Why Christianity is exclusive and that’s good

Christians must embrace and defend the exclusive claims made by Jesus of Nazareth despite growing opposition in America from secularists, pluralists, universalists, and other religious worldviews, such as Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. There is growing cultural pressure in America from pluralists and universalists to assert that all go to heaven, all behaviors are acceptable, no one can judge, and social justice (equal outcomes for all) should be a societal goal. Excepting the reference to heaven, secularists are typically congruent with these goals. As the claims of Christ differ substantially from the pluralists, universalists, and secularists of our time, it is prudent to examine the dichotomy of preference and truth claims, the laws of logic, and what Jesus actually said in an effort to speak truth to the world, represent Him accurately, and honor Him faithfully in word and deed. Continue reading