Monthly Archives: January 2010

Why won’t GOP call jihad by name?

David Petteys of Act for America, Denver chapter, and Michael Del Rosso of the Claremont Institute recently compared notes on the strange reluctance of Republicans running for office to identify our jihadist enemy in plain language. Here is their exchange:

PETTEYS: Our friend Michael Del Rosso recommended that the following question be asked of every candidate: “In your opinion, what is the greatest threat to our country and what would you do about it?” Continue reading

Dems, not GOP, are the party of big business and the rich

We so often hear that the Republicans are the party of the rich, the party of the pampered elite, the party of big business. Why do we unquestioningly accept this falsehood, instead of asking why big business is so cozy with the Democrats?

GE, Microsoft, Comcast and Time-Warner gave overwhelmingly to the Democrats. The big Wall Street banks: Goldman Sachs, J.P Morgan Chase, Citigroup, also gave much more to Democrats [opensecrets.org], as did the big insurance companies (MetLife and AIG). Continue reading

State government leaders brief CCU students

Colorado Christian University is committed to developing the next generation of leaders. One of the Strategic Objectives of the school is “To impact our culture in support of traditional family values, sanctity of life, compassion for the poor, Biblical view of human nature, limited government, personal freedom, free markets, natural law, original intent of the Constitution and Western civilization.” Continue reading

Losing sleep over “Game Change”

I have never met Senator Harry Reid, but he makes me angry. Not just for some of his stances, but because he, and others like him in Washington, cost me a lot of sleep in 2009. Let me explain.

It was around this time last year that my New York City apartment was almost constantly filled with chattering computer keys. Like all starving artists, my roommate needed a side job to supplement his internship. Continue reading

Double agony as Broncos & Longhorns both fade

After moving to the Denver area four months ago, I have become intrigued with the commitment this area has for their NFL team.

After spending the last four weeks of the NFL regular season watching the Broncos throw away their shot at the playoffs, one thought kept entering my head: I’m glad I’m not a die-hard Broncs fan. Continue reading

It must be asked: Who pushed Ritter out?

Kid-glove treatment by the Denver Post on Gov. Bill Ritter’s decision not to run again, makes me miss the Rocky Mountain News as never before. And it increases my gratitude for the feisty skepticism still alive and well in talk radio and the blogosphere.

In three days of coverage on the Ritter story by the Post, Monday night to Wednesday morning, online and in print, I haven’t seen a single mention of the Governor’s ethical and legal exposure over close aide Stephanie Villafuerte changing her story on the 2006 campaign controversy over leniency to illegal aliens. Continue reading

Tall Towers of Islam and America

What does Burj Khalifa, the world’s new tallest building dedicated this week in Dubai, have to do with the Twin Towers destroyed eight years ago? In Islamic Law non-Muslim buildings are not allowed to be higher than Muslim ones, especially mosques. According to Ahmad ibn Naqib al-Misri’s Classic Manual of Islamic Sacred Law, non-Muslims “may not build higher than or as high as the Muslim’s buildings” o11.4(5). Continue reading

Health care the capitalist way: Part 3

(Regis Student) In an arrogant display on Christmas Eve morning, the U.S. Senate gave the American people a big, dark piece of coal when it passed a massive healthcare package that simply does not address the primary problem with our system: skyrocketing costs.

According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, premiums would rise by as much as $2,000 for a family policy. The government’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services assert a 5.1 percent increase in healthcare-to-GDP spending (to 21.1 percent, currently 16 percent) with reform compared to a 4.8 percent increase by doing nothing. Continue reading

Obama: What a difference a year makes

(CCU Student) On February 10 2009, President Barack Obama’s approval rating peaked at a healthy 65.5%. The man seemed politically invulnerable with both houses under his party’s control and almost two out of three people in the country approving of the direction Obama was going to take the country. Throughout the course of 2009, Obama’s approval rating has been steadily declining and currently stands in most polls at around 50%. As the 2010-midterm elections approach, many political commentators are expecting a repeat of the 1994 election where the Republicans won major victories in both the House and the Senate, essentially a complete turnaround of the 2008 elections. Continue reading

Nine quick hits as we exit 2009

(Centennial Fellow) Hitting to all fields: (1) Barack Obama may be a far better orator than George W. Bush, but when Bush delivered a message, despite his sometimes mangled syntax, everyone knew what he stood for. Because Obama’s elocution is superior, only later do people realize they have no idea what he really meant.

(2) If overhauling the nation’s health care system is so urgent that lawmakers can’t be afforded time to read the bills before they vote, why does so much of the legislation not take effect until after the 2012 election? Continue reading