Monthly Archives: March 2010

He painted the true Colorado

(Denver Post, Mar. 7) “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” mutters a world-weary American to his paramour at the end of a Hemingway novel. The acid dismissal of love typifies suspicion of idealism in any form, a timeless temptation for humankind.

Hemingway gave his story a modern setting but borrowed its title, “The Sun Also Rises,” from Ecclesiastes, a world-weary classic of 2200 years ago. Since the novel’s publication in 1926, Americans have gone on to conquer the Depression, defeat Hitler and Tojo, end segregation and polio, win the Cold War, computerize earth and explore space. Still the stance of cynicism toward nobility and goodness is widely fashionable. Continue reading

Four questions for Sachs & the warming worriers

(CCU Faculty) Jeffrey Sachs is one of the world’s leading public intellectuals with his special chair at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and his years of leading the U.N. Millennium Project. So I was a bit surprised to see him accusing me of being on the payroll of Exxon and among those who deny the link between smoking and cancer.

He did not name me specifically but he broad-brushed everyone like me in a recent column. “We are witnessing a predictable process by ideologues and right-wing think tanks and publications to discredit the scientific process.” Continue reading

Milestones of 1860 remind us who we are

(CCU Faculty) 2010 marks the 150th anniversary of the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency. It is fitting that we recognize this anniversary, as Lincoln’s election marked a huge turning point in our nation’s history. I will accordingly offer a series of posts drawing our attention to the milestones of 1860.

Throughout much of that year, Lincoln traveled to several states to deliver many important speeches. He focused considerable attention on the issue of slavery and, while doing so, forced his audiences to consider what the United States was about. Continue reading

America in Vietnam: The Hinge of Fate

Review Essay on Lewis Sorley’s A Better War

(Centennial Fellow) In the sixty-five years since the end of World War II the most significant and formative single event in American history- beyond any question- is the Vietnam War. It reshaped our domestic politics, foreign policy, military doctrines, and popular culture in ways that still resonate powerfully nearly two generations after it ended. Continue reading

Dear Vitalie: We fear Obama, and here’s why

I recently got an email from a university professor in the former Soviet Republic of Moldova. He was my colleague, when I was a visiting Fulbright professor to his country five years ago, and he visited CCU in 1998, debating me publically on whether Vladimir Putin was responsible for the decline in personal freedom in Russia and a threat to the United States. So the other day he wrote me to ask, “How is the current US President viewed in Colorado, specifically knowing your state’s political view. You know I was always interested in U.S. politics, elections.” Since my friend is a leading expert in his country on western politics and often serves as an advisor to his government, I felt compelled to respond: Continue reading

Ex–radical warns of Islamist threat in CCU talk

(’76 Editor) Tawfik Hamid, an Egyptian medical doctor once recruited to a radical Islamist cell by Ayman al-Zawahiri (himself an MD in Egypt who has since become second in command of Al Qaeda), spoke on “Confronting Radical Islam” to a lunchtime audience of almost 100 students, faculty, and friends from the community at the CCU dining commons on March 3.

The violent and brutal doctrines assumed by many Westerners to be part of an extremist fringe are in fact mainstream Muslim teachings, Dr. Hamid said. He described an “ABC list” of such doctrines that can be used to test the claim that Islam is a religion of peace. Continue reading

Does the 2nd Amendment govern states & localities?

(CCU Faculty) In 2008, in the case of District of Columbia v. Heller, the Supreme Court decided that the highly restrictive gun control laws of Washington, D.C. were in violation of the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution. In so deciding, the Court issued a somewhat narrow opinion stating that the 2nd Amendment was offended by the decision of the federally-administered District of Columbia. What went unanswered was the extent to which the 2nd Amendment applies to all state and local government ordinances. Continue reading

‘Fastracks’ rhymes with ‘more tax,’ O’Toole warns

Randal O’Toole of the Cato Institute, author of the new book Gridlock, spelled out the fiscal folly of Denver’s light rail plans at Issue Monday, Feb. 22, hosted by the Centennial Institute at CCU’s School of Business. The mounting deficit is obvious as far away as London, where The Economist recently took note of RTD’s woes. Yet Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper, now a candidate for Governor of Colorado, continues to brag on the project, as noted in this video report from Kelly Maher of the new website WhoSaidYouSaid.com.