Before you vote on those Colorado ballot issues

(’76 Editor) Coloradans will begin voting by mail in mid-October, and a month from now the election will be over. In addition to candidate races for local, state, and federal offices, there is a typically crowded ballot for statutes and constitutional amendments to enacted or turned down by “we the people.”

The official state voter guide, or Colorado Bluebook, prepared according to law by nonpartisan legislative staff under the supervision of a state House and Senate committee, is online here. The Bluebook provides full text of each proposal and a layman’s explanation of what it does, along with arguments for and against each measure.

Ballotpedia.com also includes a detailed section on this year’s Colorado ballot issues.

Personally, I have long supported the initiative and referendum process in Colorado, regarding it as a safety valve for citizen concerns that may otherwise be suppressed by political insiders and powerful lobby groups. But I am now wondering if we have too much of this legislating by petition, and I’ll say as much on television in coming weeks. (Script linked here, scroll down to No. 5.)

CCU’s political science faculty, Greg Schaller and Tom Krannawitter, make the case that direct democracy undermines America’s founding principles of limited government and wise deliberation.

Citizens in Charge, a national advocacy group headed by Paul Jacob, makes the opposite case.

What do you think… about the various Colorado ballot issues this year… and about the process itself?

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