Monthly Archives: October 2010

Citizens must pray and participate, Reed warns

Conservative strategist Ralph Reed drew on his storied career in politics, his doctorate in American history, and his deep-dyed Christian convictions, seasoned with an impish self-deprecating wit, to deliver the first Centennial Institute lecture of the fall season, October 12 at the CCU Music Center, on “Faith and Politics in a Secular Age: What Citizenship Requires of Us, Beyond 2010 and 2012.”

John Andrews, director of the Centennial Institute, set the scene for a full house of students, faculty, and guests from the community, by noting that the Founders’ understanding of America as a nation under God has lost its unifying force for citizens amid the materialism and multiculturalism of today. Yet there is the danger that a faithless society cannot long remain a free society. The question for today, he said, is how can we “secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity,” acting individually and together? Continue reading

Demerits of 60, 61, and 101 outweigh their merits

(Centennial Fellow) The Colorado debate over ballot measures 60, 61 and 101, set to pass or fail on Nov. 2, has been anything but illuminating. According to the propaganda, voters should:

  • Vote yes to punish government at all levels for more than $1 billion in higher taxes and fees enacted without a vote of the people by Gov. Ritter and statehouse Democrats.
  • Or vote no because “The Ugly 3″ will trigger a “voter-approved recession” and put thousands of people out of work.

Continue reading

Juan Williams firing should focus Americans on jihad threat

That National Public Radio fired liberal commentator Juan Williams this week for publicly expressing on the Fox News Channel his anxieties about Muslims in America is appalling, but not surprising. NPR has long been hostile to the views of evangelical Christians and conservatives. Now, apparently, they are even hostile towards liberals who express personal sentiments on a conservative TV program. But the dustup is important not simply because it exposed once again the left-wing bias of NPR and demonstrated yet again why the network should not receive a dime of public funding. It was important because of the chilling implications over free speech in this country. Continue reading

Which candidate for CU Regent would Founders favor?

(CCU Faculty) In a political race that’s been too much under the radar, CU Board of Regents member Steve Bosley is running for statewide re-election, challenged by CU law school prof, Melissa Hart. This race will shape the board that governs the University of Colorado, and the main subject of political dispute is, well, politics, and whether it has any place in higher education.

[Editor: This article first appeared in the Denver Post, Oct. 20 online edition.] Continue reading

Muslim subversion is unchecked in US, Guandolo warns

John Guandolo, former FBI counter-terrorism expert who is now a Centennial Institute Fellow, warned in a national security briefing at CCU on Sept. 22 that the Muslim Brotherhood’s efforts to erode America’s liberty from are advancing with little awareness—and even less opposition—from all levels of government, media, and civic organizations.

He likened the situation to a football game where one team, the proponents of a global caliphate harshly governed by sharia law, is on the field and leading 56-0 while the other team, our country’s entire leadership class, is on the sidelines in baseball uniforms—and it’s still the first quarter. Continue reading

War not being politicized in 2010 election as it was in 2006

(CCU Faculty) Consider the following two quotes summarizing two polls, one from October of 2006 and the other from October 2010. Both polls concerned American’s level of support for the war efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“The latest poll from CNN and Opinion Research Corporation found only 37% of all Americans favor the war, 52% say the war in Afghanistan has turned into a Vietnam.” –October 2010 Continue reading

Oakeshott foresaw fate of ‘camel driver’ Obama

(Centennial Institute Fellow) Lots of pundits are trying to figure out why President Obama is facing disaster this midterm election, but few have said it better than Michael Oakeshott despite his disadvantage of having been dead for 20 years.

Oakeshott was an English philosopher. His specialty was politics and his disposition was to prefer “fact to mystery,” “the limited to the unbounded” and “present laughter to Utopian bliss.” He said all this in an essay titled, “On Being Conservative,” in which he also trenchantly described politicians of the opposite sort, what I would call the Obama sort. Continue reading

Day of confession, repentance, thanksgiving & supplication to be observed at CCU on 10/19

Bill Armstrong, President of Colorado Christian University, has officially proclaimed Tuesday, Oct. 19, as “A Day of Confession, Repentance,Thanksgiving and Supplication” for the university community and its friends. As classes are suspended for the beginning of an all-campus symposium on evangelism on the 19th and 20th, individual and group activities will mark observance of this solemn day. CCU undertook a similar observance in 2008. Here is President Armstrong’s proclamation: Continue reading

Tancredo surges as Hick fails to connect

(CCU Student) In November of 2009, Tom Tancredo was a controversial name in the hat of GOP hopefuls seeking the Governor’s office in 2010. However, all hopes of a Tancredo for Governor campaign were eliminated when Tom declared that he was not seeking a gubernatorial candidacy; and that rather, he would be endorsing Congressman Scott McInnis.

Fast-forward 11 months, and today’s Rasmussen Reports update shows Congressman Tom Tancredo within four percentage points of Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper. In my few years of political observation, this is potentially the most unprecedented scenario that I have ever seen. The idea of a third-party candidate who declared his candidacy in late July gaining the traction that we have seen is mind-boggling. Continue reading

President’s narcissism on display in NYT magazine

(CCU Faculty) Imagine a man, standing alone on the shoreline. Hours earlier, an earthquake rumbled miles off the coast, tsunami warnings blared and everyone else around fled to higher ground. All but this one man, all alone. He was determined to stand his ground, pointing his finger at the approaching tidal wave, shouting, “You can come ashore if you must, but you will not move me.”

The Sunday, October 17th New York Times Magazine includes a lengthy account of President Obama’s first 21 months in office and the recent struggles his administration has been facing, including the decline in his public approval polls from the mid 60’s a year ago to the mid 40’s today. Continue reading