Monthly Archives: April 2011

Proponents’ political gesturing discredits in–state tuition bill

(Editor: Venkatraj was invited to testify in the House Education Committee on Monday when SB–126, granting in–state college tuition to illegal aliens, was heard and ultimately rejected on a 7–6 vote. Here is his prepared testimony.) I am a Staff Assistant at the Centennial Institute and an Engineer Officer in the Colorado Army National Guard. My narrative as the son of immigrants may shed light on this pending legislation. Continue reading

Marijuana Day at CU Boulder

(CCU Faculty) Thursday upon arriving on the CU Boulder campus, where I moonlight from CCU history professor job, I had a hard time finding a parking place to teach my 3pm Western Civilization class. Earlier that day I had received several emails from some of my Boulder students telling me that they would be missing class due to an event in the quad. What that was, I now learned. Continue reading

There is no political panacea

(Denver Post, April 24) “To the Colorado renaissance.” That’s the oilman’s toast to the steelmaker and the railroad mogul in the new film version of “Atlas Shrugged.” As Ayn Rand’s epic novel of capitalism finally comes to the screen, more timely now than when she wrote it in 1957, our state has a starring role. You never saw the aspens so golden, the individualism so heroic, the bureaucrats so villainous. Continue reading

Holy Week, Part 2: How Easter Killed My Faith in Atheism

(Centennial Fellow) It was the worst news I could get as an atheist: my agnostic wife had decided to become a Christian. Two words shot through my mind. The first was an expletive; the second was “divorce.”

I thought she was going to turn into a self–righteous holy roller. But over the following months, I was intrigued by the positive changes in her character and values. Continue reading

Holy Week, Part 1: The Immediacy of Passover

(’76 Contributor) This evening, for the second time in a decade, I decided to add some of my own thoughts to our family’s Seder. I love to hear myself talk of course, but I’m completely unqualified for actual sermonizing. Believe me, it’s a bit of a relief not to have a rabbi as a guest this year. But I do follow the news occasionally (ok, compulsively) and that made me feel a few additions were called for. Continue reading

Books that hurt the world, or helped it, targeted by Wiker

As conservatives, unlike the left with its belief that material causation is all, we know that ideas have consequences. To gird for the battle of ideas, I recommend not only Richard Weaver’s 1948 classic by that title, but also Benjamin Wiker’s excellent companion volumes, Ten Books That Screwed Up the World (2008) and Ten Books Every Conservative Must Read (2010). Continue reading

Don’t weep for Planned Parenthood

(’76 Contributor) Lisa Wirthman writes that Planned Parenthood was bullied in the budget battle (Denver Post, April 15). Why does a billion dollar organization need a subsidy from U.S. taxpayers? Rather, Washington is using our tax money to assist a favored special interest group, the sex education and abortion industry. At the same time, Planned Parenthood has been complicit in statutory rape cases and taken donations with offensive racial overtones. Continue reading