Monthly Archives: November 2011

Show some backbone

(Denver Post, Nov. 27) “Thanksgiving and Christmas 2011, now those were tough times. The House and Senate couldn’t agree on raising taxes. Denver and Aurora couldn’t agree on the Stock Show.

“Democrats couldn’t get excited about Obama. Republicans couldn’t get excited about anyone. It was grim, I tell you. Worse than 1933, with unemployment over 20%, Hitler and Stalin menacing Europe. Continue reading

Take the hammer away from public employee unions

(Centennial Fellow) After I blogged the other day about who really won in the Ohio ballot fight over public employee unions, over at News21, my kids who live there sent a related piece published in Columbus by the mayor of a nearby small town, entitled “A few tweaks could improve collective bargaining.” They commended it to me as “thoughtful.” Continue reading

Preserving our blessings

I’m thankful. I’m very thankful. And not just today, Thanksgiving Day, but every day. I grew up in a family with loving parents and siblings. I don’t mean to demean the rest of you, but I’ve got the world’s best wife (some of you are undoubtedly pretty good, but no one can hold a candle to Courtney, the love of my life). We have a home that someday we’ll own, in the great State of Colorado, a state whose abundance of outdoor beauty and recreation gave birth to my entrepreneurial spirit. We live in a land of liberty and opportunity, and for all these things, I’m grateful. Continue reading

Rumblings from the voters in ‘wrong–track’ America

(Centennial Fellow) After suffering the only defeat of his long political career in a Cambridge, Massachusetts, election the young “Tip” O’Neill was flabbergasted to learn that his own barber had voted for his opponent. When pressed for an explanation, the barber replied simply: “He asked for my vote, Tip. You didn’t.”

Never forgetting this experience of the very personal nature of politics, O’Neill in later years as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives would give voice to a timeless maxim: “All Politics Is Local.” Continue reading

Soros’ agenda for youth: Globalism yes, America no

(CCU Faculty) In 2004 I taught Western Civilization and U.S. Foreign Policy as a Fulbright Scholar in Eastern Europe. My primary duties were at the largest state university in Belarus, as well as at their Institute of International Relations. While there I was contacted by George Soros’ Invisible College. It is one of several Invisible Colleges in European capitals, each funded by the Soros Foundation. It allowed students from both the State University and the Institute of International Relations to take courses and transfer them back to their other schools. Several of my students at the other institutions were at the Invisible College and one of them likely recommended me to them. I had the feeling that the students at the Invisible College were there by special invitation, being groomed for a particular purpose in the field of International Relations. Continue reading

Prager & Hewitt energize Coloradans at ‘Obama 365’ rally

Editor: Five hundred Colorado conservatives filled the Douglas County Events Center in Castle Rock on Nov. 7 for the “Obama 365” rally sponsored by Salem radio stations KNUS and KZNT, one year out from Election Day 2012. Featured speakers were Salem radio hosts Dennis Prager and Hugh Hewitt. ’76 Blog contributor Peg Brady produced another of her meticulously detailed steno summaries of the evening. Here is Peg’s report: Continue reading

Head On TV: Disgusted with the Occupiers

The Occupy movement is a childish tantrum that is taking on Brownshirt overtones, says John Andrews in the November round of Head On TV debates. Wrong, replies Susan Barnes–Gelt: it’s an authentic protest widely echoing that famous movie line, “Mad as hell.” John on the right, Susan on the left, also go at it this month over the off–year election results, the presidential race, and the decline of newspapers. Head On has been a daily feature on Colorado Public Television since 1997. Here are all five scripts for November: Continue reading