Author Archives: Bill Moloney

The Kremlin’s worldview: understanding Russian behavior

(Nantucket) In March it is possible to walk three or four miles along this island’s magnificent windswept beaches without encountering a single human being yet always in the presence of the awesome power of Nature in the form of the huge Winter surf that relentlessly pounds and reshapes these shores. It is an excellent circumstance to contemplate Eternal Questions or more immediate ones like “What explains Russian behavior and what should we do about it?” Continue reading

Income inequality and economic mobility: the rest of the story

(Denver) In a major speech last December President Obama stated that “a dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility is the defining challenge of our time”. It is a theme to which he has frequently returned most notably in his State of the Union Address. Continue reading

Hinge of History: Rethinking the Great War

For those who like to speculate on the “What Ifs” of History there are an abundance of books under the heading of “Counterfactual” Literature.  These works build on an imaginary premise- What If Napoleon had not invaded Russia. What If the South had won the Civil War. What If Oswald had Missed etc. – and proceed to tell readers intriguing tales of how different the world might therefore be. Continue reading

Wall Street’s binge, Main Street’s hangover

(BOSTON) – Technically the “Great Recession” ended in June of 2009, but Gallup reports that 66 percent of Americans say it’s not over yet. Economists tell us the economy is starting to look good (manufacturing & housing starts, up; gasoline prices and unemployment, down) but 68 percent of the people tell pollsters the economy is bad, and 67 percent say the country is on the “wrong track.” Continue reading

Voters saw through Amendment 66

The crushing defeat of Amendment 66 was a seismic event in Colorado politics that will also reverberate nationally. By virtue of its size, audacity, and above all its setting, Amendment 66 was a potential template for those committed to growing government and redistributing wealth. As noted by 66 opponent Kelly Maher of Coloradans for Real Education Reform Colorado, Amendment 66 could answer a question long-posed by liberal political strategists across the country: “How do you sell a massive tax increase?” Continue reading

November elections: reading the tea leaves

(Denver) I once lived in London for five years and one of the many things I admired about the British was the extraordinary speed and efficiency with which they conducted national elections: Six weeks of intense campaigning to fill all 630 seats in Parliament and then it was over for another five years.

By contrast in the United States the day after a new President is inaugurated every news program in the country is breathlessly reporting which future Oval Office aspirant was seen at a chicken bake in Iowa or snowshoeing through New Hampshire. Continue reading