Author Archives: Brad Hughes

Why Christianity is exclusive and that’s good

Christians must embrace and defend the exclusive claims made by Jesus of Nazareth despite growing opposition in America from secularists, pluralists, universalists, and other religious worldviews, such as Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. There is growing cultural pressure in America from pluralists and universalists to assert that all go to heaven, all behaviors are acceptable, no one can judge, and social justice (equal outcomes for all) should be a societal goal. Excepting the reference to heaven, secularists are typically congruent with these goals. As the claims of Christ differ substantially from the pluralists, universalists, and secularists of our time, it is prudent to examine the dichotomy of preference and truth claims, the laws of logic, and what Jesus actually said in an effort to speak truth to the world, represent Him accurately, and honor Him faithfully in word and deed. Continue reading

Impeach a president? Check the Bible

Impeachment is the process by which an official of the government is charged with criminal action. Over 10% of the world’s nation have impeachment provisions.[1] The US Constitution established the process by which impeachment is conducted in the United States. Article One of the United States Constitution gives the House of Representatives the sole power of impeachment and the Senate the sole power to try impeachments. The Constitution defines impeachment at the federal level and limits impeachment to “The President, Vice President, and all civil officers of the United States” who may be impeached and removed only for “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.”[2] Continue reading

Hope for a weary nation gleamed at WCS14

The Western Conservative Summit 2014 concluded last weekend with its largest attendance, stellar presenters, and hopeful theme, “America at its Best.” WCS ’14 demonstrated that conservative ideas cross race and gender lines and represent the best hope for a nation weary after six years  of “hopeless chains.” WCS ’14 reminded us that there are big ideas and fundamental truths that can strengthen the world’s greatest nation and restore optimism to its people. Continue reading

The Judeo-Christian Worldview and Economics

 
 Socialism embodies a lust for power based upon the deceit by man of man. Capitalism embodies a lust for wealth based upon the service by man to fellow man. Socialism concentrates power and wealth for a few. Capitalism diffuses power and wealth for many. These two opposing systems hold the promise of blessings or curses to the nation that adopts them. It is the imperative of ethics (oughtness) rather than the indicative of morality (what is practiced) that elevates the fate of a nation. A nation can not expect good if it is not itself good. The choice between capitalism and socialism is an ethical one.

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The Judeo-Christian worldview and American politics

No other worldview has had as material an impact on America and her politics as the Judeo-Christian worldview. The land that became known as the United States of America was called America long before there was a declaration of Independence.[1] The Bible tells us in Isaiah 33:22 that government should be made up of three branches, a lawgiver, a judge, and a king. This corresponds to a legislature (Congress), a judiciary (Supreme Court), and an executive (President).The primary purpose of such a government is to administer God’s justice on the earth to protect the innocent and punish the wicked. The rule of justice protects property, family, and society while preserving freedom for man who was made in the image of God. It recognizes that man is in a fallen state (sin) and that order is necessary to sustain life. The government is just one of the three primary institutions (along with the family and the church) that God established for society.

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Not so fast on ‘judge not’

(Centennial Fellow) “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” The tolerance movement in our secular culture screams this biblical passage (Matt: 7:1) to silence Christians from expressing their biblical judgment in opposition to the moral relativism of the American culture. This has become the clarion call of the millennial generation, the most unchurched cohort in America.[1] The resulting silence has helped usher in Continue reading