Author Archives: Jonathon Seidl

Beyond the bill’s constitutionality

Since my college politics class, I sometimes carry a pocket Constitution with me. Sure, there are days it camps on the kitchen table, but most days my goal is to keep the founding document in tow. While I may not have it memorized, there is one thing I know it does not contain: a provision prohibiting government health care.

Recently, it seems conservatives have been crying “unconstitutional!” with Oyez fervor when describing Obamacare. Or more graphically, the House approved Senate bill fell out of the unconstitutional tree and hit every branch on the way down. Continue reading

Forgetting the Founders

There’s a case of Founding Father forgetfulness creeping through the GOP. Sarah Palin recently showed the extent of the infection. But it seems Colorado is not immune, and may be in desperate need of the vaccine.

In a recent interview with Glenn Beck, Palin was asked to name her favorite Founding Father. While visibly scrounging through her mind’s historical file cabinet, she bought some time by declaring, “Well, all of them.” Beck fired back: “Bull crap.” Like a young paralegal, she continued to search her files, eventually producing a name: “Of course, George Washington.” The light bulb above her head was almost blinding, the relief in her face embarrassing. Continue reading

Losing sleep over “Game Change”

I have never met Senator Harry Reid, but he makes me angry. Not just for some of his stances, but because he, and others like him in Washington, cost me a lot of sleep in 2009. Let me explain.

It was around this time last year that my New York City apartment was almost constantly filled with chattering computer keys. Like all starving artists, my roommate needed a side job to supplement his internship. Continue reading

What if HB–3962 is designed to fail?

(CCU Staff) After two years of campaigns, hopeful orations, and double speak, the only citizens experiencing sweeping change may be the janitors on Capitol Hill. With the House passing the Democrat’s health care bill last week, that could change should the Senate follow suit. Failure regarding this bill, the President said, was not an option. But what if that isn’t true? What if failure is part of the design?

One of the hotly contested measures in the Democrats’ bill is an insurance mandate, which would force healthy people who do not use much health care, and often choose not to buy insurance, to purchase coverage. Continue reading