Author Archives: Mark Hillman

ObamaCare chains more of U.S. to government dole

What sets Americans apart from people in so many other countries is that we actually like working. No, every job isn’t fun, but Americans understand the dignity that comes with work. We achieve a sense of self-reliance by producing something worthwhile, creatively using our unique talents, and providing security and opportunity for ourselves and our families. Continue reading

Hickenlooper: the governor that might have been

John Hickenlooper had a chance to bring a breath of fresh air to the governor’s office.

Imminently likable and with a charmed political career, he could have been the rare maverick moderate Democrat – strong enough and bold enough to be a governor for all Colorado.  He could have been the adult in the room when liberal legislators ran amok on the lunatic fringe. Continue reading

Democrats keep sticking it to rural Colorado

(Centennial Fellow) Now that they have regained total control of the State Capitol, Democrat leaders in the legislature just cannot resist kicking rural Colorado every time they get a chance.

It was necessary, they told us, for rural Coloradans—and gun owners everywhere—to compromise our lifestyle and our freedom as part of their irrational quest to make us safer by passing laws that will continue to be ignored by cold–blooded killers like James Holmes, Adam Lanza and the Boston bombers. Continue reading

Colorado legislators spur job creation—somewhere else

(Centennial Fellow) Here’s a little exercise for Colorado business owners, managers or anyone else whose job requires that they keep the bills paid, the doors open, and customers satisfied:

  • Take a few minutes to read how legislators at the State Capitol want to treat you.
  • Then suppress the urge to go out and create a dozen new jobs. (Really, it won’t be hard to do.)

Continue reading

Obamacare ruling: A mess with a message

For anyone who naively thought the Supreme Court would render a clean and tidy decision on ObamaCare, Chief Justice John Roberts’ majority-of-one opinion should be instructive.

Rarely does the high court render an opinion that draws bright lines by simply applying the constitution as written. More often, the court’s opinion is sufficiently muddled that a future court in a similar case can arrive at any decision it desires simply by selectively quoting only the passages that support its desired outcome and ignoring those that do not. Continue reading