Category Archives: Politics

Resisting the spirit of lawlessness

The attitude of Abraham Lincoln concerning respect for the law can be summarized as such: we should obey the laws, even bad laws, until we are able to properly fix them. This may seem somewhat trivial to most, or it may seem oppressive to those who are currently living under bad laws. Nevertheless, the wisdom of Lincoln should be considered. Continue reading

Work ethic or entitlements: Americans must choose

(Centennial Fellow) On this Presidents’ Day it’s worth recalling the words of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933: “Our greatest primary task is to put people to work.”

Although sometimes considered the father of the American entitlement state, FDR understood that our sense of achievement and self-sufficiency comes from our work. Continue reading

Political junkies already eager for 2016 Senate races

(Centennial Fellow) The results of the 2014 elections had barely been tabulated before the Punditocracy launched into exhausting speculation about the 2016 Presidential contest.

For over three months a bemused public has been subjected to endless crystal ball gazing regarding the identity of America’s 45th President. With excruciating detail we’ve pondered profound questions like Why Mitt got in. then out? Will Jeb vacuum up the money? Will Huckebee and Christie have to lose weight? Will Hillary ever wear a dress? etc.etc. Continue reading

Life imitates art: Brian Williams’ manufactured reality

In the 1987 film, Broadcast News, Tom Grunich, the news anchor played by William Hurt, conducted an interview with a woman describing how she was date-raped. The interview was filmed with one camera, facing the woman. When the interview was over, reaction shots of the reporter were filmed. At one point, Grunich manufactured a tear, which was later edited into the interview sequence so that when the interview was broadcast, he was shown with a tear running down his face as the woman described her traumatic experience. Continue reading

We Need a Patriot in the Oval Office

I finally saw American Sniper, the film about Chris Kyle and his four tours of duty in Iraq. It shows the nature of warfare, the nature of human nature and the nature of peace through strength.

Warfare is barbaric. It always has been. And it shows the depth of human depravity. From the earliest records of warfare, the objective has been to win. Each culture sets its limits of what it will or will not do to win. Some will seek to protect non-combatants. Some have no moral boundaries at all. But regardless of the rules of engagement, the objective of winning requires killing a sufficient amount of an enemy to subdue him and his people. Most who engage in a war of aggression or defense seek the most efficient route to winning the spoils they want or protecting what they have. Continue reading

Ten Things I Learned in the Legislature

Editor: Republican attorney and businessman Spencer Swalm served in the Colorado General Assembly (as his late father also did), representing House District 37 in Centennial from 2007 to 2015, departing under term limits on January 7. We asked him to sum up the lessons learned from those eight years, all but two of them Continue reading

Think again: the real deflate-gate

Aired-out uproariously on “Saturday Night Live,” “Deflategate” has been a national fixation since word broke that the New England Patriots used underinflated footballs in their Super Bowl-berth-clinching victory over Indianapolis. The alleged-cheating controversy has even pumped up the loveability of the oft-despised Seattle Seahawks.

However, Think Again if you believe Deflategate is merely hot air. Though overblown, Americans’ disquiet reflects our fairness instinct and commitment to equality of opportunity — the ideal that all competitors in the race of life, no matter their status, can succeed on a level playing field. Continue reading