Category Archives: World

Economic and political realities spell end of EU dream

(St. Petersburg, Russia) The French and Greek elections of May 6, 2012 signify the beginning of the end for the “Europe Project”. The competing visions of two remarkable Frenchmen – Jean Monnet and Charles De Gaulle – have been decisively resolved in favor of the latter.

Nearly seventy years ago in the wake of two catastrophic world wars, Monnet became known as the “Father of Europe” by advocating a unified destiny for his battered continent. Continue reading

Koran apology is another symptom of US dhimmitude

We are witnessing the greatest surrender, abject acts of submission to sharia, and the most embarrassing episodes of dhimmitude yet seen in America. I thought things were bad in the United Kingdom and Spain.

If you follow Diana West’s work, you’ve already seen this video, in which General John Allen, the supreme commander of the ISAF forces in Afghanistan, made a statement apologizing to the “noble people of Afghanistan” for the destruction of Islamic religious paraphernalia confiscated from prisoners of war. Continue reading

Economic freedom losing ground in US & globally

(CCU Student) Economic freedom in the USA is unmatched, right? Wrong, according to a policy briefing given today at The Heritage Foundation, which I attended as part of my CCU Washington semester.

Ambassador Terry Miller, Director of Heritage’s Center for International Trade and Economics, spoke on the 2012 Index of Economic Freedom, co-published by Heritage and the Wall Street Journal. The Index scores 179 economies from around the world on ten factors in four major areas: rule of law (property rights and freedom from corruption), limited government (fiscal freedom and government spending), regulatory efficiency (business freedom, labor freedom, and monetary freedom), and open markets (trade freedom, investment freedom, and financial freedom). Continue reading

Athens to Rome by Sea: Ruminating on the Ruins

(Rome) If one would conjure in imagination what Gibbon called the “Glory that was Greece and the Grandeur that was Rome” a worthwhile approach is to set sail upon Homer’s “wine dark sea” and in select ports of call contemplate with awe the visible Ruins of those mighty civilizations that are the foundation of our own. On a recent cruise, my wife and I did just that. Continue reading

Soros’ agenda for youth: Globalism yes, America no

(CCU Faculty) In 2004 I taught Western Civilization and U.S. Foreign Policy as a Fulbright Scholar in Eastern Europe. My primary duties were at the largest state university in Belarus, as well as at their Institute of International Relations. While there I was contacted by George Soros’ Invisible College. It is one of several Invisible Colleges in European capitals, each funded by the Soros Foundation. It allowed students from both the State University and the Institute of International Relations to take courses and transfer them back to their other schools. Several of my students at the other institutions were at the Invisible College and one of them likely recommended me to them. I had the feeling that the students at the Invisible College were there by special invitation, being groomed for a particular purpose in the field of International Relations. Continue reading

Crossing Canada by rail, we had a window on history

(Vancouver) Jefferson’s decision to purchase the Louisiana Territory from the French for the bargain basement price of fifteen million dollars in 1803 is one of the most stunning exercises of Presidential authority in our history. Yet when Jefferson sent Lewis and Clark to explore this patch of real estate that more than doubled the size of the country, they reported back that the absence of viable transport routes—no roads, few navigable rivers—meant that little could be done to economically exploit the new territory in the foreseeable future. Continue reading

In keeping America alive, we ennoble the lives lost

(Opening Remarks at Campus Ceremony, Sept. 12) How should we approach our commemoration of September 11, 2001, here at Colorado Christian University? Here are some thoughts from my perspective as director of the Centennial Institute, our public policy center at the university.

On the second Tuesday in September ten years ago, Islamist fighters from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Lebanon and the UAE, trained in Afghanistan by the Al Qaeda revolutionary organization under Osama Bin Laden, took over four US airliners and turned them into missiles of war for an attack on New York City and Washington DC. Continue reading