Tag Archives: health care

Carson: practical and passionate at #WCS14

Dr. Ben Carson may have separated twins conjoined at the head, but at the 2014 Western Conservative Summit he joined American patriots at the heart.

A characteristically practical and inspirational speech from Dr. Carson ended Friday night’s opening session and left audience members chanting “Run, Ben, Run!” as they were empowered with specific strategies for saving America’s future.

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American medicine today: A profession under siege

(Boston) The distinctions of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) are many: Affiliation with Harvard Medical School, 3rd oldest U.S. hospital (1811), 2nd highest ranking in the U.S. News survey, world’s largest hospital based research program ($750 million dollar annual budget), and no less than eleven Nobel Laureates have worked or trained there. Continue reading

Think again: If you like your freedom, you can keep it

In the waiting room of Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s radiation treatment center, I discovered that in the race of life, those running to stay on the track are among the most determined, hopeful and courageous. They’re also grateful, for it’s in the sanctuary of sympathetic and expert care where cancer patients experience calm and clarity after the storm of diagnosis and decision-making. Continue reading

Shutdown shows need for Article V convention

The shutdown of many parts of the Federal government due to the debate over Washington’s control of medical care is just a symptom of a much deeper problem. As significant as is the debate over who should control our medical systems, it is but one aspect of the real problem.

We have lost our vision for constitutional federalism. Continue reading

Think again: High noon lessons for America’s lawmakers

With several political climaxes looming, it serves to recall “High Noon” starring Gary Cooper as Will Kane, the beleaguered marshal who single-handedly confronts paroled murderer Frank Miller and his gang. As civil society’s elected protector, Kane is a reluctant hero, abandoned by his cowering and self-interested townsfolk. Improbably victorious, he departs town, flinging his badge with contempt for the citizens who wouldn’t defend the rule of law on which their freedom, prosperity and security depend. Continue reading

More health care ‘help’ we can’t afford

(Centennial Fellow) Legislators talk frequently about the Law of Unintended Consequences but rarely seem to recognize when a bill they support will, if passed, inevitably collide with that law.

Such is the case with House Bill 1021, which would require individual insurance policies to cover a normal pregnancy, childbirth, maternity care, pregnancy management and contraception. Continue reading

A businessman’s plea for common sense on health care

(’76 Contributor) It seems to me that in spite of the near-paralysis of government at all levels on meaningful reforms for health care, our runaway costs need someone’s attention. Fewer and fewer small businesses can now afford anything but an insurance package that has a huge deductible. So as a totally inexperienced drafter of such proposals, but with my share of business experience in the real world, I am so bold as to offer the following simple start: Continue reading

Self–sufficiency can stop the bribery

Bismarck, Prussia’s Iron Chancellor, once said, “Laws are like sausages. It’s better not to see them being made.” In the case of the current government, bound and determined to take over our health care system regardless of public opposition, never have so many Americans been privy to the making of sausage—and it hasn’t been pretty. One must wonder if this much bribery and corruption are in plain view, what must be going on behind the scenes? Continue reading

Health care the capitalist way: Part 3

(Regis Student) In an arrogant display on Christmas Eve morning, the U.S. Senate gave the American people a big, dark piece of coal when it passed a massive healthcare package that simply does not address the primary problem with our system: skyrocketing costs.

According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, premiums would rise by as much as $2,000 for a family policy. The government’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services assert a 5.1 percent increase in healthcare-to-GDP spending (to 21.1 percent, currently 16 percent) with reform compared to a 4.8 percent increase by doing nothing. Continue reading