Tag Archives: John Andrews

A nation with resolve

Contemplating a resolution for the New Year? Here’s a suggestion. Resolve to put America back on the path of greatness. A centralized government that bestows “equality” by redistributing wealth did not buoy the United States to strength and prosperity. Freedom of opportunity coupled with responsibility made America special. Continue reading

Five Lessons from Conservative Persuasion Bootcamp

It happened right under our noses, even though we all knew better: a cabal of determined con men and women got everyone to believe that they were championing open and enlightened discourse, while they were actually just frightening everyone into silence ahead of the reality that the oligarchic governmentality to which they entitled themselves was in fact completely incoherent. Continue reading

Andrews book looks past 2012 to 2076. Will we get there?

(‘76 Contributor) The impermanence of political systems and political glory has never been better portrayed than in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s sonnet, “Ozymandias.” It depicts a toppled, broken statue in the desert, on whose base some long-forgotten tyrant had inscribed his title as “king of kings” and boasted: “Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair.”

What the poet dramatized in 14 ironic lines, the writer of Ecclesiastes had earlier captured in a single word: vanity. Continue reading

Counterpoint: Keep term limits in Colorado

(’76 Contributor) As truth seekers we are obliged to review everything, including term limits, with the utmost objectivity. My complaint about term limits is that this reform is far too modest to save us from what ails our society.

A point from the book Reinventing Government was spot on, “The New Deal paradigm of government is obsolete.” Clinton was president then and made the book famous, but did nothing to build on its few sound points. I approached the authors (Osborne and Gaebler) to ask why he had not articulated what the new paradigm might be. No response. Continue reading

Politically disgusted? Pick up your pencil

(Denver Post, Feb. 7) “Both ends of the political spectrum are disgusting,” said reader Bill Hoppe in an email after my Jan. 24 column on bipartisan irresponsibility. “It becomes increasingly difficult to believe in our legislature at any level.”

Deborah Kelly’s letter to the editor, published here on Jan. 31, was equally despairing: “I can’t afford health insurance, and after the Supreme Court decision regarding campaign financing, now I can’t afford to vote either.” Continue reading