Tag Archives: tabor

Don’t punish taxpayers for prosperity

Colorado’s economy has shown remarkable resiliency in the wake of the Great Recession.

Unemployment has steadily fallen from a high of 9.6% in 2010 to an estimated 4.1% in November 2014.

Income indicators roared past pre-recession levels and now both wages and salary and per capita income are significantly higher.

In the past five years, taxes and fees paid by Coloradans to their state government have grown by 43% from $8.5 billion to an estimated $12.3 billion in the current year.

And next year, state revenue could surpass the state’s spending limit for the first time in 15 years, triggering a modest rebate to taxpayers of $116 million or 0.4% of next year’s state budget.

But those in the Government Always Needs More Money Choir just can’t stand this prosperity. They are howling that that this modest refund – and perhaps future refunds, if the economy continues to grow – are somehow strangling our state government. Continue reading

In Colorado, mutual distrust between Dems & voters

(Centennial Fellow) Four years ago, Colorado voters decided to trust Democrats with complete control of state government – the governor’s mansion and large majorities in the legislature.

As voters consider their choices for 2010, they might be surprised by how little governing Democrats have trusted voters in those four years. Continue reading

Declaration of Dependence: Sign here

(Denver Post, May 2) “Son, you have become a man. Mom and I are so proud of your maturity. In turning 21 today and taking a bride tomorrow, you reach the age of emancipation. This is literally your time of being set free, entering upon self-determined adulthood. What a milestone.

“Because we care for you and your wife and children, we’ll stay involved as parents in a few small ways. We will provide a house for you, and cars as needed. We will supply you energy for all those. Of course we’ll always cover the medical bills for you and the kids. Costs of school and college will be on us as well. Plus an income floor. Pay a share of these things if you can, but don’t strain yourself. It’s our tribute to your independence.” Continue reading

If Dems prevail, no more voting on taxes

(Centennial Fellow) After imposing more than $1 billion a year in tax and fee increases – without once seeking voter approval – liberal Democrats in the Colorado legislature now want voters to permit them to raise taxes without limitation and without ever asking voters again.

Can you say, “Oblivious to irony”? Continue reading

‘Taxed Enough Already’ rally on 3/10 points toward 4/15

Several hundred Coloradans gathered yesterday at the state capitol to remind our government officials that we pay the bills. Sponsored by a coalition of independent but like-minded organizations, including the Independence Institute, the rally vigorously reasserted our role as citizen-leaders.

Important points were addressed. Paramount were these messages to our state and federal legislators: Stop irresponsible spending and uphold the values of the citizens you represent. We don’t want Obamacare. We don’t want nannyism. We don’t want economy-crippling taxes and regulation. Continue reading

TABOR suit assumes we’re sheep

(Denver Post, Feb. 21) Mobilize the militia. Fire up the Humvee. Get down the musket off the mantelpiece. Boulder is preparing to invade Colorado.

Yes, a lawyer from up in the progressive paradise says that your right to vote on taxes violates his constitutional entitlement to ever-increasing teacher salaries and NEA indoctrination of our kids. The invasion is no joke, because Herbert Fenster is a legal heavyweight and his intended enforcer is a robed priesthood answerable to no one. TABOR could be in trouble. Continue reading

Whereas, to really stabilize PERA for good &helip;

(’76 Editor) I asked former Treasurer Mark Hillman what sort of genuine PERA stabilization bill he would file if the two of us were still state senators, in light of his concern expressed in the previous post that the current bipartisan Senate Bill 1 doesn’t get at the root of the problem. He recommended the following three steps:

* Raise the retirement age to 67 for anyone who hasn’t been in a PERA-covered job for more than 5 years. Continue reading