Tag Archives: Ukraine

U.S. risks repeating mistakes of history

Looking back on the events of the last few weeks, I found myself wondering if there’s a Russian word for Lebensraum. For those who have an appreciation of the history of World War II — I’m not sure how modern progressive high school history texts might refer to it, if at all — the parallels between the Nazi’s territorial expansion and Russia’s recent actions in Crimea are striking and more than a little terrifying. Continue reading

The Kremlin’s worldview: understanding Russian behavior

(Nantucket) In March it is possible to walk three or four miles along this island’s magnificent windswept beaches without encountering a single human being yet always in the presence of the awesome power of Nature in the form of the huge Winter surf that relentlessly pounds and reshapes these shores. It is an excellent circumstance to contemplate Eternal Questions or more immediate ones like “What explains Russian behavior and what should we do about it?” Continue reading

Is this the start of Cold War II?

The Cold War haunted many of us when we were young, whispering always about the possibility of nuclear exchange, sometimes, as in the Cuban Missile Crisis, shouting about it, and reminding us of another kind of life, of an oppressive, miserable slave-state existence some saw as justice. It seemed that it would last forever except that suddenly the Soviet Union crashed. The Cold War was gone. Continue reading

Think Again: Inequality and a tale of two Ukrainians

Last week, as Ukrainian emigre- turned-tech tycoon Jan Koum prepared to cash a multibillion-dollar check from Facebook — acquirer of his startup “WhatsApp” — Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich was checking out of his Gatsby-esque estate where he’d cached his stolen plunder. Continue reading