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Publius #3 – Our Factious Nature

“The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man; and we see them everywhere brought into different degrees of activity, according to the different circumstances of civil society. A zeal for

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Publius #2 – No Angels Among Us

“Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature, that such devices should be

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What a debt we owe Washington and Hamilton

(By Bill Moloney, Centennial Fellow) With the new year comes a superb new book that sheds important light on what we often forget is the single most important period in all of our nation’s history.

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I Have a Dream

(By Ellen Densmore, 1776 Student Scholar) Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path

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Reflections on wealth, sea power and national destiny

(Centennial Fellow Bill Moloney writes from Venice)  In 1890 an obscure Naval War College Professor -Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914)- published The Influence of Sea Power Upon History.  An instant classic the book had an electrifying

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Freedom’s 800th birthday: Doing your part?

(By Douglas Bruce, ’76 Contributor) Tradition accepts June 15, 1215 as the start of limited government in Anglo-American law. Magna Carta (“great charter’) was signed under duress by King John. John was the brother and

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Still striving for freedom

Eight hundred years ago on 15 June 1215, the English people compelled King John to endorse the Great Charter – Magna Carta. The Great Charter confirmed the ancient rights of “all the community.” So what?

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Still striving for freedom

(By Peg Brady, ’76 Contributor) Eight hundred years ago on 15 June 1215, the English people compelled King John to endorse the Great Charter – Magna Carta.  The Great Charter confirmed the ancient rights of

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Resisting the spirit of lawlessness

The attitude of Abraham Lincoln concerning respect for the law can be summarized as such: we should obey the laws, even bad laws, until we are able to properly fix them. This may seem somewhat

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