Ideas

Can we trust the government with the death penalty?

By |May 26th, 2015|

I shall ask for the abolition of the punishment of death until I have the infallibility of human judgment demonstrated to me. -Gilbert du Motier, Marquis du Lafayette (yes, that one)

I find that I am essentially for the death penalty in theory, but against it in practice. That’s one of those statements that is in danger of meaning nothing, like “supporting the troops but not the war.” In this case, however, I understand my position well enough to use such a platitude with my eyes wide open. […]

The enduring tension that is modern conservatism

By |May 26th, 2015|

The preeminent conservative intellectual forum called the Philadelphia Society devoted its recent meeting to exploring the roots of its philosophy, especially conservatism’s mid-20th century rebirth at National Review magazine under William F. Buckley, Jr. and Frank Meyer. Discussants could not ignore an important fact: that the modern conservative movement was born bearing a revealing quirk. […]

Thoughts on woman power

By |May 1st, 2015|

A powerful woman versus a woman in power: which one are you, which one is she? Let’s explore, shall we?

Since the beginning of time women have had an exceptional gift of influence, leadership and compassion. […]

Christ and his cross have lessons for leaders

By |March 31st, 2015|

(Centennial Fellow) The week that stretches from Palm Sunday through Easter is the most significant week of the Christian’s year. Historically and spiritually, this week marks Jesus’ triumphant […]

The Decalogue and its deniers

By |December 22nd, 2014|

(’76 Contributor) Western civilization has relied for over 3000 years on the code of belief and practice that Jews and Christians believe God gave Moses, the Ten Commandments. The Decalogue, as it is also called, […]

Why pluralism can't substitute for religious freedom

By |November 13th, 2014|

(Centennial Fellow) I recently read a series of articles that promote the idea that Christians should adopt a pluralistic approach in order to be relevant in present times. (See articles by law professor John Inazu in Christianity Today one from July 2014 here and one from October 2014 here). […]

Jeffco dramatizes US schools' history deficit

By |October 3rd, 2014|

(Centennial Fellow) Refuse to think, assume the worst, overreact, disregard laws and rules and then pronounce yourself someone standing up for the best in education. That’s what we’ve recently witnessed in Colorado’s Jefferson County, the scene of pretentiously delinquent student walkouts and teacher stay-at-home protests cheating young people out of learning. […]

Joan Rivers’ life lessons: Can we talk?

By |September 26th, 2014|

(’76 Contributor) God knows Joan Rivers had much to atone for every Yom Kippur, considering her trenchant wit, off-color jokes and celebrity takedowns — though sidesplitting. […]

A polymath aces the ultimate exam

By |September 10th, 2014|

(’76 Editor) I’m not sure what morbid exam fantasies haunt students today, but eons ago when I was in college, we used to laugh about the ultimate nightmare question on a final: “Explain the universe in 500 words or less and give examples.” […]

Defending liberty

By |July 22nd, 2014|

We exist in a vast sea of ignorance and lack of understanding in regards to history, politics, and ideology. Not to mention the implications of each upon our nation and civilization. Perhaps we should not be surprised that large segments of society can’t put the Civil War in the correct century or begin to find major countries on a map. There are entire political ideologies that rely on that mind-numbing, and sometimes frightening, misunderstanding and basic ignorance that a significant portion of society manifests as a source for their power and strength. […]