Universities and liberal education: Lamenting our loss

By |March 16th, 2014|

(Centennial Fellow) Martin Gilbert, in his biography of the greatest leader of the 20th century, Winston Churchill, tells of rumors seeping out to Germany of “the extent of the German slaughter of Jews on the eastern front, the murder by gas of Polish Jews in three special death camps […]

Can we legislate morality? Yes and no

By |March 15th, 2014|

(CCU Faculty) I would like to begin and end my comments this evening rather inauspiciously by referring to my two favorite curses, the first of which has most certainly alighted upon our nation, and the second of which we may yet hope to escape. […]

Memo to Cuomo: Exiling us only penalizes you

By |February 26th, 2014|

(’76 Contributor) In an interview on a local radio station a few weeks ago, Andrew Cuomo, the Democratic governor of the state of New York, bluntly announced that “extreme conservatives” were no longer welcome in the state. […]

Conservative principles and the common man

By |February 17th, 2014|

The raging, twenty-four-seven political debates that virtually consume social media, many news sites, and entire cable stations is mostly filled with cheap shots, one-liners, bumper sticker slogans, and the same tired, half-truth arguments. […]

Think Again: Masculinity and the War on Poverty

By |January 18th, 2014|

As a binge TV watcher, I’ve relished devouring serial dramas in advertising-free gulps. But “Breaking Bad” — the story about a cancer-stricken chemistry teacher turned clandestine meth-cooking badass — didn’t appeal. Then Anthony Hopkins declared it an “epic work” with “the best actors I’ve ever seen.” […]

Not so fast on 'judge not'

By |December 28th, 2013|

(Centennial Fellow) “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” The tolerance movement in our secular culture screams this biblical passage (Matt: 7:1) to silence Christians from expressing their biblical judgment in opposition to the moral relativism of the American culture. This has become the clarion call of the millennial generation, the most unchurched cohort in America.[1] The resulting silence has helped usher in […]

A nation with resolve

By |December 22nd, 2013|

Contemplating a resolution for the New Year? Here’s a suggestion. Resolve to put America back on the path of greatness. A centralized government that bestows “equality” by redistributing wealth did not buoy the United States to strength and prosperity. Freedom of opportunity coupled with responsibility made America special. […]

The real tragedy of the commons

By |December 3rd, 2013|

Hint: It’s still the liberal progressive communitarian apocalypse. […]

On Black Friday, Trying to Understand How to Prevent Other Days from Becoming Black

By |November 30th, 2013|

We live in difficult times, and I don’t mean obstacles to consumption over the next month. The only way to understand them is to try, and to enlist others to try along with us. So try these out: […]

"Open data," influence, and ethics in government

By |October 30th, 2013|

This past Friday, I headed up to Parker to attend CityCamp Colorado 2013: Change The Game. CityCamp is the annual conference of OpenColorado.org, an organization dedicated to “support[ing] a transformation that will lead to a simple, beautiful, and easy-to-use government”. Now, I’m aware that the word limited did not appear in that vision statement. But I believe the pursuit of transparent and accessible government data is one that encourages citizen engagement, and thus at least has the potential to diffuse the policy analysis and implementation process from concentration in the hands of a professional bureaucracy. With properly informed citizens, that is a good thing. However, ethical qualifications to the collection and usage of large government data sets are valid concerns. I was at times a bit worried that I was the only one so concerned. […]