Politics

Marriage decision will force resistance

By |June 24th, 2015|

The Supreme Court is expected to rule that defining marriage to be only between one man and one woman denies equal protection under the law and is therefore unconstitutional. The court could even rule that […]

Freedom’s 800th birthday: Doing your part?

By |June 11th, 2015|

(By Douglas Bruce, ’76 Contributor) Tradition accepts June 15, 1215 as the start of limited government in Anglo-American law. Magna Carta (“great charter’) was signed under duress by King John. John was the brother and successor to Richard the Lion Heart, whose loyal subjects included that tax rebel, Robin Hood. […]

U.S. and British elections: changing patterns of party alignment

By |June 6th, 2015|

(By Bill Moloney, Centennial Fellow)  Dateline Washington, DC: As I write from the Imperial City- ablaze as always with partisan speculation – the conversation at our table at the Old Ebbitt Grill is about an […]

Immigration policy & politics won’t be solved by judges

By |June 1st, 2015|

(By Helen Raleigh, Centennial Fellow) Recently, the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals let stand a lower-court injunction that temporarily blocked  the Obama administration from carrying out President Obama’s executive order which would make illegal aliens eligible for “lawful presence, work authorization and associated benefits.” […]

Still striving for freedom

By |June 1st, 2015|

(By Peg Brady, ’76 Contributor) Eight hundred years ago on 15 June 1215, the English people compelled King John to endorse the Great Charter – Magna Carta.  The Great Charter confirmed the ancient rights of “all the community.”  So what?  Magna Carta is the foundation of America’s Constitution, our defense against tyranny, corruption and civil decay. […]

Conservatives would be wise to resist populist temptations

By |May 29th, 2015|

It’s a not uncommon phenomena in American politics for left and right to circumnavigate the spectrum and forge periodic and unlikely alliances. This is particularly prone to occur when elements of the right succumb to the temptations of populist ideology. […]

Can we trust the government with the death penalty?

By |May 26th, 2015|

I shall ask for the abolition of the punishment of death until I have the infallibility of human judgment demonstrated to me. -Gilbert du Motier, Marquis du Lafayette (yes, that one)

I find that I am essentially for the death penalty in theory, but against it in practice. That’s one of those statements that is in danger of meaning nothing, like “supporting the troops but not the war.” In this case, however, I understand my position well enough to use such a platitude with my eyes wide open. […]

The enduring tension that is modern conservatism

By |May 26th, 2015|

The preeminent conservative intellectual forum called the Philadelphia Society devoted its recent meeting to exploring the roots of its philosophy, especially conservatism’s mid-20th century rebirth at National Review magazine under William F. Buckley, Jr. and Frank Meyer. Discussants could not ignore an important fact: that the modern conservative movement was born bearing a revealing quirk. […]

At the intersection of race and poverty

By |May 19th, 2015|

(Centennial Fellow) When I was in law school, I had the privilege of working at the Institute on Race & Poverty. IRP was focused on issues that were found at the intersection of race and poverty. IRP recognized that while race and poverty were concerns independent of each other, when they intersected, it raised a different and more complex set of concerns. I appreciated that perspective as a law student, but as a professional and a community member, the realities of that perspective have deepened over time. […]

Elections in Anglosphere surprise — and alarm

By |May 19th, 2015|

Two elections recently took place within the Anglosphere — both with rather startling, and quite opposite, results.

Despite extensive prognostication to the contrary, Great Britain granted David Cameron’s Conservatives a victory — a majority at that. […]