Colorado Christian University

News: Justice Scalia Visits CCU

Justice Scalia to Visit Colorado Christian University

On October 1, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia will visit Colorado Christian University. During his time on campus, Scalia will teach a class and take part in CCU's 100 year anniversary celebrations.

"We are very honored to welcome Justice Scalia," said CCU President Bill Armstrong. "He is a brilliant jurist and America's foremost proponent of originalism in constitutional interpretation, and one of the greatest men of the 20th and 21st centuries."

Justice Scalia studied history at Georgetown University, where he graduated summa cum laude and as valedictorian. He earned his J.D., which was awarded magna cum laude, at Harvard Law School.

Scalia began practicing law in 1961 and shifted to teaching at the University of Virginia Law School in 1967. He served in Washington DC in the 1970s, which included arguing a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, before returning to teach at the University of Chicago Law School.

In 1982, President Reagan appointed Scalia to the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. There, he won admiration for his judicial record and powerfully written opinions. Four years later, Reagan nominated Scalia for the 'Highest Court' in the land, where he has been serving since 1986. Scalia is the longest-tenured justice on the current Court.

"It is a distinct honor and privilege of the highest order to have Justice Scalia visit our campus and speak to a class of students," said Dr. Kyle Usrey, professor at CCU, who was responsible for the invitation to Justice Scalia. "It is rare to have a man of this caliber available to dedicate some time in conversation with us here at CCU, just before the new Supreme Court term commences."

As October 2014 marks CCU's centennial, Scalia's visit will add import to a time of celebration and commemoration. His record fits integrally with CCU's own strategic objectives, which include impacting culture in support of an "original intent of the Constitution."